Sunday, December 10, 2006

Scranton Times: We've abandoned our City Hall press room

Meow! In an unusual and lengthy "note to readers," Scranton Times-Tribune editors write that the mayor lets all Scranton reporters use the City Hall press room gratis -- not that the Times-Tribune needs it.

22 comments:

Anonymous said...

While I knew Stacy Brown was spending more time in the newsroom, I was unaware that the paper had completely abandoned the City Hall office. That is unfortunate. The office was a valuable resource in plugging into what is going on at City Hall.
By the way, it's my understanding that there was a time when others in the media used the office. I don't know why they abandoned it either.

John Mitchell said...

For the love of mike, city hall is two blocks from the Times Tribune, they can certainly cover city government without an office in the building. Other papers cover their cities more aggressively than the Times Tribune and from a greater distance.
Accepting free office space from the city, no matter who's in charge, puts the paper in business with the powers that be. Better to be completely independent and two blocks away than be sitting in the building and indebted.
By the way, describing that office as anything but a private workplace for Shedlock/Brown/Times Shamrock is ridiculous. It was their phone, their computer, their personal furnishings. I'd like to know the last time anybody else used that room.
This move is long overdue.

Anonymous said...

Why nothing on the BIG defection from the TL?

Anonymous said...

How 'bout you give us the facts on the big T-L defection? I'd love to know, so let's have it.

Anonymous said...

By the way, describing that office as anything but a private workplace for Shedlock/Brown/Times Shamrock is ridiculous. It was their phone, their computer, their personal furnishings.

Once again dickbrain Mitchell doesn't complete the story.

Yes, all of the furnishings belonged to the TT because they actually did do work in there. That never meant other media couldn't use the room - they just chose not to.

Anonymous said...

TT City Hall reporters felt so indebted to the Connors administration for the use of an office over 12 years that he was blasted daily. Give me a break. Doherty's free pass on certain issues has more to do with bias up the food chain than with an office. Working in the building gives a type of access that just is not there otherwise. Things get slipped under the door. You hear things on the way to the bathroom or in the elevator. It makes a difference. If the city wants to charge TT for the space, fine. Depending on the price, it's worth it.

Anonymous said...

TT City Hall reporters felt so indebted to the Connors administration for the use of an office over 12 years that he was blasted daily...

Yeah, and for 12 years he survived the daily beat-down that he got from the Penn Ave. The lesson in there isn't all that clear to me; it's either a testament to his resilience and popularity, or an inidcation that a paper's ability to sway public opinion isn't what some think it is.

Anonymous said...

Still nothing about the defection????

Anonymous said...

Once again TT management fails to understand that reporters need to be out and about, talking with people face-to-face about issues and scuttlebutt, not in the third floor newsroom doing phoners. You won't trip over the news there.

Anonymous said...

Stacy's had the best stories out of city hall in years, doesn't seem to be hurting him. I guess that's called being a pro, not an excuse maker.

Anonymous said...

"Accepting free office space from the city, no matter who's in charge, puts the paper in business with the powers that be."

8:23 AM


Jee-zus! You newspaper hacks would compromise your integrity and sell your souls for a goodamn chair to sit on? Sit on THIS, ink-stained whores.

Anonymous said...

Larry Beaupre is a cocksucker

John Mitchell said...

"Once again dickbrain Mitchell doesn't complete the story.

"Yes, all of the furnishings belonged to the TT because they actually did do work in there. That never meant other media couldn't use the room - they just chose not to. "

Oh, and Times Shamrock management graciously put all that equipment in the office for the benefit of the other media? Give me a break.

The office was not available to anyone else in the Scranton meida, only those who had a key.

Dickbrain John

Anonymous said...

Yo' dickbrain,

They put the furniture and computer there for Times writers to use. What do you expect them to use, milk crates? Anyone else who wanted to use the room needed to get their own computer. Anyone who wanted a key could have had one. The keys came from city hall, not the TT. Stop being a know-it-all blowhard.

Anonymous said...

What about this defection? Who defected? To where? I live out in Noxen and don't get the daily paper, so I need to be clued in.

Anonymous said...

FYI: TT provided a computer, phone and fax machine. Most of the actual furniture (desk, chairs, filing cabinets) belonged to the city. It's the same situation at the courthouse, except other media uses the office there to wait out trials (at least they did, I'm not sure if they still do). The courthouse office is also more prominently located right near Central Court. The City Hall office is tucked in a corner on the third floor. Television crews generally spend very little time at City Hall. They do their interviews or checks and leave. They are not doing dedicated City Hall coverage like the TT beat reporter.

Anonymous said...

who is John Mitchell???

Anonymous said...

I think he's one of the DD tax crazies.

Anonymous said...

I feel sorry, very sorry for the poor guy who lives in Noxen.

Anonymous said...

I made that up. I don't really live in Noxen. I just was curious about the defection. Everyone knows they don't have Internet service in Noxen.

Anonymous said...

You got that right. I hear they don't have regular mail service, but use Pony Express. A lot of inbreeding there too. This all adds up to fertile ground for Times Scumrock readers.

Anonymous said...

Other media did stop in, but mostly for short periods during a news event.